Discussion:
Delaware outlaws Cb radio
(too old to reply)
radioguy
2011-06-19 18:39:59 UTC
Permalink
. The law even specificIf federal law overrules state law as most
posters in these newsgroups say, then why is the California state law
outlawing transmitting on frequencies your fcc license says you can
overruling federal
law.
If federal law overrules state law as most posters in these newsgroups
say, then why is the Delaware state law outlawing transmitting on
frequencies the FCC says you can overruling federal
law
more info
at
http://www.wgmd.com/?p=6432
Bill Graham
2011-06-19 19:53:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by radioguy
. The law even specificIf federal law overrules state law as most
posters in these newsgroups say, then why is the California state law
outlawing transmitting on frequencies your fcc license says you can
overruling federal
law.
If federal law overrules state law as most posters in these newsgroups
say, then why is the Delaware state law outlawing transmitting on
frequencies the FCC says you can overruling federal
law
more info
at
http://www.wgmd.com/?p=6432
Watts are important here. If you are talking 100 milliwatts or less, then
you can transmit pretty near anywhere and at pretty near any frequency.
These are the levels of garage door openers and cordless phones. They are
only good for 100 yards or less. But most lawmakers can't tell a watt from a
volt or an amp. They are technical minus people, or they would get a real
job and actually contribute to the society instead of parasiting off of it.
Barry
2011-06-20 09:56:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bill Graham
Post by radioguy
. The law even specificIf federal law overrules state law as most
posters in these newsgroups say, then why is the California state law
outlawing transmitting on frequencies your fcc license says you can
overruling federal
law.
If federal law overrules state law as most posters in these newsgroups
say, then why is the Delaware state law outlawing transmitting on
frequencies the FCC says you can overruling federal
law
more info
at
http://www.wgmd.com/?p=6432
Watts are important here. If you are talking 100 milliwatts or less, then
you can transmit pretty near anywhere and at pretty near any frequency.
These are the levels of garage door openers and cordless phones.
Garage door openers probably operate at less than 1 milliwatt and
cordless phones at a few milliwatts.
I can receive my 20 mw 434 Mhz walkie talkie several kilometres
away.
Post by Bill Graham
They are only good for 100 yards or less.
Or several kilometres.
Post by Bill Graham
But most lawmakers can't tell a watt from a
volt or an amp. They are technical minus people, or they would get a real
job and actually contribute to the society instead of parasiting off of it.
You have a strange idea of power levels.
Bill Graham
2011-06-20 18:10:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by Barry
Post by Bill Graham
Post by radioguy
. The law even specificIf federal law overrules state law as most
posters in these newsgroups say, then why is the California state
law outlawing transmitting on frequencies your fcc license says
you can overruling federal
law.
If federal law overrules state law as most posters in these
newsgroups say, then why is the Delaware state law outlawing
transmitting on frequencies the FCC says you can overruling federal
law
more info
at
http://www.wgmd.com/?p=6432
Watts are important here. If you are talking 100 milliwatts or less,
then you can transmit pretty near anywhere and at pretty near any
frequency. These are the levels of garage door openers and cordless
phones.
Garage door openers probably operate at less than 1 milliwatt and
cordless phones at a few milliwatts.
I can receive my 20 mw 434 Mhz walkie talkie several kilometres
away.
Post by Bill Graham
They are only good for 100 yards or less.
Or several kilometres.
Post by Bill Graham
But most lawmakers can't tell a watt from a
volt or an amp. They are technical minus people, or they would get a
real job and actually contribute to the society instead of
parasiting off of it.
You have a strange idea of power levels.
Copi8ed from the internet:

Technical properties
Some DECT properties:[citation needed]

a.. Audio codec: G.726, G.711, G.722 (wideband), G.729.1 (wideband) and
MPEG-4 ER LD AAC (wideband and super-wideband)
b.. Net bit rate: 32 kbit/s
c.. Frequency: 1880 MHz-1900 MHz in Europe, 1900 MHz-1920 MHz in
China,?1893 MHz-1906 MHz in Japan, 1910 MHz-1930 MHz in Latin America and
1920 MHz-1930 MHz in the US and Canada, US DECT and DECT 6 products may NOT
be used in the UK as they cause and suffer interference to the UK 3G
cellular networks with unlicensed use of such products being prohibited by
UK agencies. As DECT and DECT 6.0 do not operate in the 2.4 GHz ISM band,
they are not subject to the interference arising in this band from its use
by 802.11b and 802.11g WiFi, and 2.4 GHz cordless phones.
d.. Carriers: 10 (1,728 kHz spacing) in Europe, 5 (1,728 kHz spacing) in
the US
e.. Time slots: 2 x 12 (up and down stream)
f.. Channel allocation: dynamic
g.. Average transmission power: 10 mW (250 mW peak) in Europe, 4 mW (100
mW peak) in the US
I was talking about the maximum power allowed by law for such devices, and
not the minimum that some cleaver manufacturers have been able to achieve. A
lot depends on the frequency and the available antenna swystem.
Roy
2011-06-19 20:58:07 UTC
Permalink
Post by radioguy
. The law even specificIf federal law overrules state law as most
posters in these newsgroups say, then why is the California state law
outlawing transmitting on frequencies your fcc license says you can
overruling federal
law.
If federal law overrules state law as most posters in these newsgroups
say, then why is the Delaware state law outlawing transmitting on
frequencies the FCC says you can overruling federal
law
more info
at
http://www.wgmd.com/?p=6432
Delaware didn't outlaw CB radio. It decided that CB radios fell under
the hands-free cellphone law while driving.
radioguy
2011-07-17 06:28:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by radioguy
. The law even specificIf federal law overrules state law as most
posters in these newsgroups say, then why is the California state law
outlawing transmitting on  frequencies your fcc  license says you can
overruling federal
law.
If federal law overrules state law as most posters in these newsgroups
say, then why is the Delaware state law outlawing transmitting on
frequencies the FCC says you can overruling federal
law
more info
at
http://www.wgmd.com/?p=6432
Delaware didn't outlaw CB radio.  It decided that CB radios fell under
the hands-free cellphone law while driving.
read it again, although they did not outlaw ham radio , they,
Delaware, outlawed even having a cb radio in vehicles at all unless
it is in a commercial vehicle If a cb radio is in a private non-
commercial passenger vehicle, it is illegal accordin to the new
Delaware law, and you are violating the law, according to the new
Delaware
law
and they wold have outlawed ham radios in them also if they could have
However, they could not since the Fcc rules say they can
not.
The Delaware law, as written and passed, outlaws even having a cb
radio in a non-commercial vehicle even if it is mounted connected to
the vehicle as usual. The law in that state says a cb radio is only
legal in s vehicle if it is mounted in a commercial vehicle . non-
commercial passenger vehicles are NOT exempt. Delaware has also made
driving more dangerous with this law. I have driven through cities
where the cities were broadcasting one-way traddic reports and road
conditions on cb channel 19 which made my drive and other drivers
drives safer as we kknew wgich roads they were doing constrution work
on and to take and not take among other things. Now, if I have to
travel to Delaware, my only choices are to leave a radio in my car and
get fined or to spend time taking the radio out and travel through the
other heavy-traddic cities without being able to hear the traffic
safety reports those cities provide on cb channel 19 which makes the
drive MORE dangerous and causes MORE accidents ,since regular am and
fm broadcast stations no longer provide any such services since media
consolidation, Dumb Delaware has made the roads more dangerous and
increased the likelyhood of traffic accidents,

richard
2011-06-19 21:20:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by radioguy
. The law even specificIf federal law overrules state law as most
posters in these newsgroups say, then why is the California state law
outlawing transmitting on frequencies your fcc license says you can
overruling federal
law.
If federal law overrules state law as most posters in these newsgroups
say, then why is the Delaware state law outlawing transmitting on
frequencies the FCC says you can overruling federal
law
more info
at
http://www.wgmd.com/?p=6432
If the law is taken literally, then yes, any state that bans "hand held
devices", would include CB radios.
But I believe most cops would not enforce that aspect of the law.

But would that law include hand held units that are not attached to the
vehicle? Some cops may see those as they see cell phones.

That's an argument that would have to be settled in a court of law.
True, the FCC authorizes the use of CB radio. But states, certainly can
restrict their use in a vehicle. That does not deny the use of them by any
means. You just can't yack while driving.

BTW lawmakers, take a good close look at some expensive ham radio equipment
for mobile use. What's that? You don't see that dial pad on the radio?
Guess what dude? That hammy can make phone calls with his radio just the
same as any cell phone.
Scott in Baltimore
2011-06-19 23:39:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by richard
BTW lawmakers, take a good close look at some expensive ham radio equipment
for mobile use. What's that? You don't see that dial pad on the radio?
Guess what dude? That hammy can make phone calls with his radio just the
same as any cell phone.
You'd be pretty hard pressed to find an actual working auto patch anymore.
There are none in Baltimore as the misfits ruined it for everybody.
richard
2011-06-20 01:16:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by Scott in Baltimore
Post by richard
BTW lawmakers, take a good close look at some expensive ham radio equipment
for mobile use. What's that? You don't see that dial pad on the radio?
Guess what dude? That hammy can make phone calls with his radio just the
same as any cell phone.
You'd be pretty hard pressed to find an actual working auto patch anymore.
There are none in Baltimore as the misfits ruined it for everybody.
Well that's boston for ya. It's screwed up in every respect.
In cincinnati, auto patch still thrives well because of the people that run
it.
although it is probably not used as much since cell phones are in wide use.
Bill Graham
2011-06-20 04:11:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by Scott in Baltimore
Post by richard
BTW lawmakers, take a good close look at some expensive ham radio
equipment for mobile use. What's that? You don't see that dial pad
on the radio? Guess what dude? That hammy can make phone calls with
his radio just the same as any cell phone.
You'd be pretty hard pressed to find an actual working auto patch
anymore. There are none in Baltimore as the misfits ruined it for
everybody.
It usually isn't the misfits who ruin that stuff. Its the authorities
inability to tell the difference between misfits and normal people. "they
are quick to throw everybody into the same "misfit bag".
mike oxbig
2011-07-08 03:37:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by radioguy
. The law even specificIf federal law overrules state law as most
posters in these newsgroups say, then why is the California state law
outlawing transmitting on frequencies your fcc license says you can
overruling federal
law.
If federal law overrules state law as most posters in these newsgroups
say, then why is the Delaware state law outlawing transmitting on
frequencies the FCC says you can overruling federal
law
more info
at
http://www.wgmd.com/?p=6432
Hi dave and debby!
Scott in Baltimore
2011-07-08 11:08:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by mike oxbig
Hi dave and debby!
No. D&D were much more original.
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